City report says changes to Seattle single-family zoning could improve housing

Photo by Tom Rumble on Unsplash

A Seattle planning commission report is the first effort from Seattle City Council in years to tackle issues with single-family zoning in Seattle. The report details that single-family zones that make up about 75 percent of the residential land in Seattle have accommodated only five percent of the new housing added in Seattle in the last decade. 

Mike Rosenberg | Seattle Times

The single-family zoning that dominates Seattle has priced people who aren’t rich out of most of the city’s neighborhoods, is contributing to income and racial inequality, and has forced the city’s booming population to crowd into small pockets of the city, a new planning-commission analysis concludes.

The advisory report released Monday stops short of recommending major citywide density but advocates for some mild changes that could affect districts that are mostly detached houses now. For instance, it asks for more duplexes near schools, expanding the boundaries of urban villages by a few blocks and reducing lot sizes to squeeze more homes into streets.

To read the full article, click here: Changes to Seattle’s single-family zoning could improve housing picture, city report says