Teamify: When and Why to build a real estate team – by JLS’s Jim Remley and James Colburn

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In this RISMedia article, John L. Scott Affiliate owner Jim Remley and James Colburn, Broker and Director of Business Development for JLSREA, discuss their upcoming book Teamify and offer a free teams webinar on the Secrets of Top Selling Agents website.  You can check out the webinar here.

Teamify: When and Why to Build a Real Estate Team

By Mark Mathis, General Manager of Sales at Homes.com

Many successful REALTORS® struggle with whether or not they should create a team or consider a partnership. Team-building experts Jim Remley and James Colburn make answering those questions much less of a struggle. Remley and Colburn are co-authors of the upcoming book, “Teamify,” which they describe as the “no headache, step-by-step guide to creating a winning real estate team, crushing your competition, and getting your life back.” They should know.

At age 19 Remley listed over 150 properties in a 12-month period. He’s currently listed in the top 1 percent of REALTORS® nationwide. He’s the author of three books, including “Real Estate Presentations That Make Millions” and “Sell Your Home in Any Market.” He’s an accredited Luxury Home Specialist and the principal broker/sales manager at John L. Scott Medford & Ashland.

Co-author Colburn is well established, as well. He’s been a top-producing REALTOR® since the 1990s and is the author of the five-star success book “RESUCCEED.

In a recent webinar, Remley and Colburn outlined the questions you must ask yourself, and the path you must follow to create a winning team or partnership—beginning with common misconceptions and surprising realities about what teams and partnerships are, and what they are not. Remley and Colburn explained what each structure can and can’t realistically accomplish for your firm, and explain what every REALTOR® needs to consider before moving forward.

The No. 1 Reason for Creating a Team
Do you want more leads? Teams are a great way to get them—but only if you’re in a position where a team will work for you, not against you. Just because everyone else is doing it, you’re too busy to go it alone, you want more of a work/life balance, or because you want to make more money, isn’t reason enough. Your No. 1 reason for creating a team should be that you consistently have more leads than you can follow up on.

“The No. 1 thing to consider when thinking about starting a team is the number of leads you have. Do you have them, and can you generate enough of them to feed a team?” Remley asked.

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